Asian Financial Crisis Definition - asian crisis in market politics wake

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asian crisis in market politics wake - 1997 Asian financial crisis - Wikipedia


Sep 02, 2003 · Politics and Markets in the Wake of the Asian Crisis covers a range of East Asian countries including the People's Republic of China, South Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia. All the studies are linked together by a common endeavour to explore the dynamic interaction between global economic forces and domestic structures.Book Edition: 1st Edition. At the end of the twentieth century capitalism stands triumphant. Yet, it has not been the liberal model of free markets, democratic politics, rule of law and citizenship that has enjoyed general ascendancy. Within Asia, a range of dirigiste, predatory and authoritarian systems have emerged under the general rubric of Asian Capitalism.

The fallout from the crisis in Asia has been immense. Asia's position as the global economy's growth engine is no longer tenable. Politics and Markets in the Wake of the Asian Crisis puts the crisis in its global context, reassessing its impact on governments and economies around the world. The arguments in this book will contribute significantly to the construction of a new research agenda for comparative political economy at the dawn of a new century.Politics and Markets in the Wake of the Asian Crisis covers a range of East Asian countries including the People's Republic of China, South Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia.

Politics and markets in the wake of the Asian crisis Tools RDF+XML BibTeX RDF+N-Triples JSON RefWorks Dublin Core Simple Metadata Refer METS HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote MODS OpenURL ContextObject in Span MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Reference Manager RDF+N3 Multiline CSVCited by: 85. Politics and markets in the wake of the Asian crisis. [Richard Robison; Asia Research Centre.; Sang-Young Rhyu --Fragility or continuity? economic governance of East Asian capitalism / Hyuk-Rae Kim --The dilemma of market liberalization: the financial crisis and the transformation of capitalism / Yeon-Ho Lee and Hyuk-Rae Kim --A meltdown.

The assumption is that state intervention has to be minimized if the market is to be liberalized; that is to say, the state’s non-economic intervention in the market is not justified. But its application to East Asian economies is highly problematic and even dangerous, where the state has played the role of ‘market planner or governor’ for compressed economic growth.Cited by: 5. 4 THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE ASIAN FINANCIAL CRISIS. 3 December, South Korea agreed to a massive Fund program backed by additional resources from the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and other countries in the region.